About the Nakamura Tea Brand

Hand-Roasted Kyo Bancha

What Is Hand-Roasted Kyo Bancha?

“Bancha” is the most difficult tea to define because it has different meanings and connotations according to the different regions. In Kyoto, “bancha” generally refers to “kyo bancha.” Kyo bancha is a tea which is fired and is made of larger and coarser leaves and stems, which are harvested after the gyokuro or tencha harvesting seasons are over. The leaves are too big and hard to knead after steaming, so they are dried as is and fired at high temperature in large iron pots right before being shipped out. This is how we produce our "Hand-Roasted Kyo Bancha."
Because kyo bancha has a unique sharp aroma, people either love it or hate it. Some are very surprised at its unique aroma and appearance when they first try (or see) it. Some say, “It smells like tobacco,” “It looks like fallen leaves,” or “It contains twigs like pencils.” However, it tends to make people “addicted;” they cannot enjoy Other Tea Variations once they are accustomed to it. Due to traditional hand roasting, our kyo bancha has an especially strong smoky fragrance and contains a lot of blackened leaves and twigs, but they are totally fine products. We highly recommend you to try it once!

Hand-Roasted Kyo Bancha

How to Make Good Cups of Tea (for two)

Unlike sencha or hojicha, Hand-Roasted Kyo Bancha is hard to brew in a regular tea pot and needs to be boiled in a kettle. The tea can be enjoyed hot or cold once the tea leaves are removed and is thus recommendable for everyday use.

  • Tea Leaves
    40g
  • Water Temperature
    100℃
  • Water Amount
    2-3L
  • Waiting Time
    2-3 minutes of boiling

(1) Pour 2-3 litres of water in a kettle and boil completely.
(2) Insert 40 g (2-3 heaping handfuls) of tea leaves into the boiling water.
(3) Continue boiling for approximately 2 minutes and remove the tea leaves. Boil longer when using a self-fill tea filter bag or similar.

When using a kyusu tea pot, break the tea leaves into smaller bits and pour boiling water over the leaves.

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